Michigan - Abolishment of the Death Penalty
1847 Law and 1963 Constitutional Amendment


The 1963 Michigan Constitution abolished the death penalty for all crimes in Section 46: "No law shall be enacted providing for the penalty of death."

Prior to that Michigan banned the death penalty for all crimes except treason with its May 18, 1846 law that banned the death penalty as punishment for first degree murder and which stated, "All murder that shall be perpetrated by means of poison or lying in wait, or any kind of willful [sic], deliberate and premeditated killing, or which shall be committed in the perpetration or attempt to perpetrate any arson, rape, robbery, or burglary, shall be deemed murder of the first degree, and shall be punished by solitary confinement at hard labor in the State Prison for Life; and all other kinds of murder shall be deemed murder of the second degree, and shall be punished by confinement in the penitentiary for life, or any term of years, at the discretion of the court trying the same."



Sources:
Clarke Historical Library, "Michigan Historical Calendar: September 24," www.clarke.cmich.edu (accessed Aug. 15, 2012)
Michigan Legislative Website, "The Constitution of the State of Michigan of 1963," www.legislature.mi.gov (accessed Aug. 15, 2012)