Last updated on: 10/6/2016 | Author: ProCon.org

Dan Markel, JD Biography

Title:
Former Assistant Professor at the Florida State University College of Law
Position:
Con to the question "Should the Death Penalty Be Allowed?"
Reasoning:

“I appealed to the notion that embedded within the confrontational conception of retribution is a commitment to respecting the dignity of every person, a dignity we affirm by punishing offenders for the consequences of their freely chosen and autonomous actions. Such respect for human dignity entails obligations to the offender as well as to ourselves, and among those is the obligation not to punish in a way that erodes human dignity. Capital punishment degrades dignity, on this view, because it unnecessarily extinguishes human life in the presence of viable alternatives. Taken together, these reasons counsel in favor not only of a blanket commutation, but also the abolition of the death penalty itself.”

“State, Be Not Proud: A Retributivist Defense of the Commutation of Death Row and the Abolition of the Death Penalty,” Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, Summer 2005

Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Assistant Professor, Florida State University College of Law, 2005-2014
  • Associate, Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans, & Figel, Washington DC, 2002-2005
  • Research Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard Law School, 2001-2002
  • Law Clerk, Judge Michael D. Hawkins, US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, 2001-2002
  • Teaching Fellow, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 1997-2001
  • Summer Associate, Mayer, Brown & Platt, Washington, DC, 1999
  • Legislative Aide, Dr. Naomi Chazan, MK, Deputy Speaker, Israeli Knesset, 1995-1996
  • Founder and Editor in Chief, Prawfs.com
Education:
  • JD, Harvard Law School, 2001
  • MPhil, University of Cambridge, 1997
  • AB, Harvard College, 1995
Other:
  • He passed away on July 19, 2014
Quoted in:
  1. Should the Death Penalty Be Allowed?
  2. Should Victims' Opinions Matter When Considering the Death Penalty?