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North Dakota - Abolishment of the Death Penalty
S.L. 1973, ch. 116, § 41


According to North Dakota Supreme Court Justice Dale V. Sandstrom, "In January 1915, state Representative L. N. Torson...introduced House Bill No. 33 to abolish the death penalty. After a number of revisions, including amendments making it retroactive and adding an 'emergency clause' to make it effective on approval rather than the usual date of July 1, the bill cleared the House...In the Senate the Bill...was amended to provide the possibility of death by hanging for killing a prison guard--although the broader language covered anyone convicted of a first degree murder while under a life sentence for first degree murder."

In 1973, the North Dakota Legislature abolished the death penalty entirely by repealing Title 12, Chapter 12-50 with S.L. 1973, ch. 116, § 41.




Source: Dale V. Sandstrom, "Four Capital Murder Trials Since the Last Execution in 1905," www.ndcourts.gov (accessed Aug. 16, 2012).